I know that I hear plenty of excuses for not getting a flu shot. None of them are really worth their salt. Everyone really, really should get an annual flu shot. Period. End of discussion.

 

Looks like the flu is getting better.

From CDC:

Antigenic Characterization*

CDC has antigenically characterized 1,281 influenza viruses [1,113 2009 H1N1 viruses, 118 influenza A (H3N2) viruses, and 50 influenza B viruses] collected by U.S. laboratories since October 1, 2013 by hemagglutination inhibition (HI).

2009 H1N1 [1,113]:

  • 1,112 (99.9%) of 1,113 2009 H1N1 viruses tested were characterized as A/California/7/2009-like, the influenza A (H1N1) component of the 2013-2014 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine. One (0.1%) virus showed reduced titers with antiserum produced against A/California/7/2009.

Influenza A (H3N2) [118]:

  • All 118 influenza A (H3N2) viruses tested have been characterized as A/Texas/50/2012-like, the influenza A (H3N2) component of the 2013-2014 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine.

Influenza B [50]: 31 (62%) of the 50 influenza B viruses tested belong to B/Yamagata/16/88-lineage and the remaining 19 (38%) influenza B viruses tested belong to B/Victoria/02/87 lineage.

  • Yamagata Lineage [31]: 31 influenza B/Yamagata-lineage viruses were characterized as B/ Massachusetts/2/2012-like, which is included as an influenza B component of the 2013-2014 Northern Hemisphere trivalent and quadrivalent influenza vaccines.
  • Victoria Lineage [19]: 19 influenza B/Victoria-lineage viruses were characterized as B/Brisbane/60/2008-like, which is included as an influenza B component of the 2013-2014 Northern Hemisphere quadrivalent influenza vaccine.

*For more information see the section on antigenic characterization in the MMWR “Update: Influenza Activity — United States and Worldwide, May 19–September 28, 2013”.

Things seem to be getting better in West Virginia also.

From WVHH:

Statewide Temporal Trend of Influenza-Like Illness by MMWR Week
(2010-11, 2011-12, 2012-13, 2013-14 Seasons)

The figure below displays the number of influenza-like illness (ILI) cases reported during the 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 influenza seasons.  ILI is defined as fever > 100˚ F AND cough and/ or sore throat without another identified cause.  ILI can be caused by a variety of respiratory viruses, so data should always be interpreted in the context of laboratory data.  ILI cases are reported by physicians to local health departments.  Local health departments report the data weekly to the state. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention compiles weekly data and reports the data by “MMWR week.” Usually, there are 52 MMWR weeks per year. Some years, there are 53 MMWR weeks.

 

This year is represented by green. We seem to have peaked and our now getting better.