Tag Archives: rick davis

What's going on – Evening News Roundup

Monday Evening News Roundup

  • Congratulations to the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for defeating the Boston Red Sox in game seven and advancing to the World Series. The Philadelphia Phillies have already defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers to make it to the ultimate show. Although major networks may not be happy since big time television markets (Los Angeles and New York) will not be directly involved, this should be a good series featuring excellent baseball. This continues a trend that we’ve been seeing over the last several years where the team with the most expensive roster is sitting at home watching the World Series. I like this trend.
  • Did John McCain solicit campaign contributions from the Russian ambassador? A generic “send a contribution to” letter was sent to the Russian ambassador. I guess the question is what mailing list was the Russian ambassador on?
  • It is now clear that the John McCain campaign will stoop to any level and renege on any promise in order to try to gain an advantage. Campaign manager Rick Davis (former lobbyist for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac) stated in an interview that they were rethinking their position on Reverend Jeremiah Wright.
  • Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke told members of the House Budget Committee that he favored another stimulus package for the economy. The White House is reportedly “open” to new proposals. Isn’t that a day late and several billion dollars short? Democrats have been calling for an additional stimulation package for months.
  • Governor Sarah Palin was on Saturday Night Live this weekend. It isn’t clear to me exactly how well the McCain campaign thought this out. Saturday night live was a show that not many people were watching before Tina Fey began lampooning Sarah Palin. Fey’s impression of the governor is hilariously accurate. She portrays the governor’s cluelessness perfectly. So how does this help the McCain-Palin ticket?
  • Congressman John Conyers (chairman of the House Judiciary committee) is seeing a lot of similarities between the US attorney scandal in this latest dustup over ACORN. Democrats tend to want to focus on the issues. We tend to downplay these “meaningless” distractions. I think ignoring this major Republican push would be detrimental to our chances of winning the White House and in gaining seats in Congress this November. The GOP is showing us a very coordinated effort to whip up public sentiment against ACORN. In a move typical of the Harlem Globetrotters, the Republicans will have America focused on ACORN (a group which has never committed voter fraud but has admittedly submitted erroneous voter registrations) while THEY THEMSELVES are committing widespread “voter caging” and vote suppression in multiple ways in multiple different states. This is serious.

Palin Flounders on CBS Evening News

I would like to see what Governor Sarah Palin’s preparation for these interviews entails. It doesn’t seem that she actually prepares for anything. Tonight, she was on Katie Couric’s CBS evening news.

Couric asked Palin about Rick Davis, the campaign manager whose firm has lobbied for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. Even though this is really a softball question, she really does not have a coherent answer. She should have had the answer memorized because there was no way that Couric wasn’t going to ask a question about Rick Davis. How can she fumble the ball so badly? She could have made a strong statement like, “I have spoken with Rick Davis personally. He has assured me that he hasn’t received any money from Freddie or Frannie in over 18 months.” In my opinion, this is a much better answer than what she offered. It is positive and forceful. It stops you from looking like a moron and puts the responsibility on Rick Davis where it belongs.

One of her talking points is that Americans are waiting to see what Senator John McCain is going to do. Interestingly, Couric asked her why she believes that. Her answer is fascinating and naïve. She said that she does not look at poll numbers (remember Bush said this years ago) that suggest Americans trust Senator Barack Obama more than they trust McCain with the economy. Instead of trusting polls, Palin says that she believes that at the end of the day Americans will look at McCain’s track record and experience. Now that’s something she doesn’t have.

Maybe the problem is that she over-prepared. She learned too many talking points that she cannot put together a coherent sentence without throwing in a talking point. Maybe that’s the problem. I know, I’m grasping at straws.

Couric further asked if we are looking at another Great Depression. The answer that any intelligent politician who could be one heartbeat away from the presidency should give would be “We are not going to let that happen. We’re going to roll up our sleeves and do the interventions necessary to prevent another Great Depression.” (My wife doesn’t like this answer. She thinks that it sounds too canned. Maybe she is right. I know that I don’t like a major politician saying that we may be headed into a Great Depression.) How hard is that?

Obviously, it is incredibly hard because that is not what she said. Instead of something coherent, Palin said, “Unfortunately, that is the road that America may find itself on. Not necessarily this, as it’s been proposed, has to pass or we’re going to find ourselves in another Great Depression.” What? Can someone help this lady, please?

When asked is she would support a moratorium on foreclosures, Palin can’t answer the question. So, Couric tries to get Palin to explain the pros and cons of a moratorium on foreclosures. Palin can’t do that either. She throws out some gobbledegook about predatory lenders and then drifts back to her talking point on a comprehensive long-term solution. She never mentions what that solution is, nor how she and McCain will lead us to this mystery solution.

Palin has become painful to watch. This is worse than watching a train wreck. This is more like that scene in the movie Misery where James Caan gets his ankles broken. It is that painful.

Update: McCain Suspends Campaign

Desperate times call for desperate measures. When you are sinking in the polls like a brick in the Atlantic Ocean, you have to do something.

One of Senator John McCain’s top campaign advisors, Rick Davis, is under fire for his lobbying efforts on behalf of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. One of his chief political advisors, Carly Fiorina is under fire for her $42 million “golden parachute.” This is McCain at his best, using this financial crisis as a political opportunity.

McCain is pretending to be putting his country first when, in fact, he’s being self-serving. He would like to postpone the debates and suspend his campaign. He asked Barack Obama to do the same. If he is able to suspend his campaign, then he is able to stop the hemorrhaging. He’s able to freeze his numbers in the polls while he figures out what to do.

There is no doubt that this is a historic crisis, but McCain has not put together any proposals to fix this crisis. Therefore, how could his input on Capitol Hill would be helpful? Can’t he still attend meetings on Capitol Hill and prepare for a debate? This is another Hail Mary pass, just like choosing Sarah Palin as a running mate.

From Harry Reid:

I understand that the candidates are putting together a joint statement at Senator Obama’s suggestion. But it would not be helpful at this time to have them come back during these negotiations and risk injecting presidential politics into this process or distract important talks about the future of our nation’s economy. If that changes, we will call upon them. We need leadership; not a campaign photo op.

From Barack Obama’s campaign:

At 8:30 this morning, Senator Obama called Senator McCain to ask him if he would join in issuing a joint statement outlining their shared principles and conditions for the Treasury proposal and urging Congress and the White House to act in a bipartisan manner to pass such a proposal. At 2:30 this afternoon, Senator McCain returned Senator Obama’s call and agreed to join him in issuing such a statement. The two campaigns are currently working together on the details.