Tag Archives: minnesota law

Franken may be declared the winner…or not

In a saga that appears to be running as long as the soap opera Days of Our Lives, the closing arguments in the (almost Senator) Al FrankenFormer Senator Norm Coleman case will be given tomorrow. I would expect a ruling by the first week in April. It would be a big surprise to everyone in the world, including the Coleman team, if Coleman is declared anything other than the loser. 

Minnesota law may actually play into Al Franken’s favor. The loser of this court case is required to pay the legal costs, which could empty out Coleman’s bank accounts. In order to push the appeals process, Franken’s lawyers may ask the court for Coleman to pay money up front for the appeals (escrow). In conjunction with the Coleman camp’s screw-up, allowing donor’s credit card information to be sitting on the web without encription, this may be over before the end of April. 

Hope springs eternal.  🙂

Franken ahead at end of recount (update)

From the Star-Tribune:

Al Franken won an impressive share Saturday of what may be the last ballots tallied in the U.S. Senate recount, boosting his unofficial lead over Sen. Norm Coleman to 225 votes heading into a Monday meeting where the state Canvassing Board will certify the final result of the race.

At least two things, however, still stand in the way of Franken becoming Minnesota’s newest U.S. senator: the possibility of a ruling by the Minnesota Supreme Court that more wrongly rejected absentee ballots should be counted, and a legal contest that Coleman attorneys all but promised should Franken prevail. (more… )

Could it be that this recount is over? Could Al Franken be Senator Al Franken? Now we have to wait for all of the lawsuits to be settled.

From TP:

Al Franken holds an unofficial lead of 225 votes over incumbent Republican Sen. Norm Coleman. “With the recount complete, focus immediately shifted to the Minnesota Supreme Court, which continued to consider a request from the Coleman campaign to alter the process and add more absentee ballots to be reconsidered.” Eric Kleefeld notes that “Minnesota law is unique in that it prohibits the issuing of an official certificate of election until the legal challenges are all resolved.”