Tag Archives: joe biden

Thursday Evening News Roundup

Thursday Evening News Roundup

Another school shooting. Another student who felt that he’d been “bullied” or alienated. Another death. A teacher and a “school staffer” stood face-to-face with the gunman and talked the student into giving up his gun. (695 Americans have died since the Sandy Hook Shooting.)

In what can only be described as a complete waste of the vice president’s time, Joe Biden met with National Rifle Association officials. It should not come as a complete shock that the NRA plans to oppose any gun control measures.

Today, I was a guest on Local Edge Radio. We had a very passionate young man call in and support the rights of gun owners. He clearly stated that he did not believe that the Second Amendment supported your right to protect yourself and your family or your right to hunt with a gun. Instead, he insisted that the Second Amendment was put in place for us to be able to protect ourselves against an oppressive government. Therefore, we, the citizens of the United States, needed to have access to whatever kind of firepower the military had access to. I foolishly asked if that meant that we should have access to tanks, antiaircraft weapons and bazookas. He said yes. I would put this gentleman forward as someone who represents the extreme right on the gun issue. 🙂 Continue reading Thursday Evening News Roundup

Saturday Morning News Roundup

Saturday Morning News Roundup

In the aftermath of not just Barack Obama’s victory but what was a solid night for progressives in general, some conservatives have simply lost their minds. Take for example the CEO of Applebee’s. According to Mr. Zane Tankel, ObamaCare will be so costly for the restaurant that they’ll probably have to shrink their workforce and they won’t be building any more restaurants.

One of the latest myths that Republicans are conjuring up is that it is all Hurricane Sandy’s fault. If it weren’t for an act of God, Mitt Romney would have won the election. Republicans began to trot this line of reasoning out shortly before the election. Here’s what Nate Silver had to say

When the hurricane made landfall in New Jersey on Oct. 29, Mr. Obama’s chances of winning re-election were 73 percent in the FiveThirtyEight forecast. Since then, his chances have risen to 86 percent, close to his highs on the year.

But, while the storm and the response to it may account for some of Mr. Obama’s gains, it assuredly does not reflect the whole of the story.

Mr. Obama had already been rebounding in the polls, slowly but steadily, from his lows in early October — in contrast to a common narrative in the news media that contended, without much evidence, that Mr. Romney still had the momentum in the race.

As the above graph clearly shows, Mitt Romney did have some momentum after the first debate. Joe Biden’s strong performance in the vice presidential debate put a halt to that momentum. The second and third presidential debate were clearly won by Barack Obama. Obama was undoubtedly ahead in the polls by the time hurricane Sandy hit. The other thing, and almost more importantly, is that it really didn’t matter what was happening in the national polls. Instead, the important thing was what was going on in Virginia, Ohio, Colorado and the other battleground states. The conservatives don’t want to talk about that. Mitt Romney never moved the needle in places like Ohio.

Just because Allen West has lost his re-election bid in Florida doesn’t mean that he is crazy. It doesn’t mean that he will go away.

Barack Obama at the DNC

President Barack Obama at the DNC.

From EJ Dionne:

Obama’s was a speech aimed less at shaking up the campaign than in building on an existing narrative. The president did not defend his economic record. He left that to Bill Clinton. He did not even promise rapid recovery. On the contrary, he told voters: “I won’t pretend the path I’m offering is quick and easy.”

Indeed, he seemed to reach back to John F. Kennedy’s call on the nation to ask not what the country could do for them, but what they could do for the country. “As citizens,” Obama said, “we understand that America is not about what can be done for us. It’s about what can be done by us, together, through the hard and frustrating work of self-government.”

And thus his redefinition of hope and change. Faced with assertions that he can no longer inspire the elation he called forth four years ago, Obama challenged those who had supported him to stay in the fight for the longer-term and do the work required for saving their original vision.

From NY Editorial Board:

President Obama’s dilemma has always been that he has been far more successful a president than his opponents claim, but far less successful than he needs to be at making voters see that. Powerful speeches by former President Bill Clinton, Vice President Joe Biden and others did a lot to fix that impression during the convention. But it was up to Mr. Obama to make the case for another term, with a speech that was every bit as fraught with uncertainty and risk as his 2008 convention address.

Just as he did then, Mr. Obama rose to the occasion.

He could have sold some of his best lines with more passion, but gone was the maddening coyness of recent years in which he has avoided candidly talking about the mess that President George W. Bush dumped into his lap and shied away from the rumble of politics. He didn’t hesitate to go after Mitt Romney. “You might not be ready for diplomacy with Beijing if you can’t visit the Olympics without insulting our closest ally,” he said.