Tag Archives: infrastructure

Please Help Puerto Rico

By now, all Americans should know that Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands really got slammed by hurricane Maria. Both of these tropical paradises are in dire need. The problems are many. It is become a fight for survival. They need the basics: food, clothing, shelter. Their infrastructures been devastated.

This foundation was started and is supported by the Indiana Academy of Family Physicians. They’re trying to purchase and ship generators to Puerto Rico. I’m sure that you’ve already donated something to someone or to some organization. But please consider donating some money to this just cause. I appreciate it.

News Roundup – Galaxy Note 5, PGA Championship, Trump

Galaxy Note 5 by Samsung. I love the Note 4. It is the best phone that I have ever owned. Great camera. Great battery life.

One of the truly funny and amazing things about golf is that the supposedly “smart guys” will set up a scenario. For the PGA championship the scenario was Jordan Spieth versus Rory McElroy. They want this rivalry to develop so badly but it just hasn’t. At the beginning of round three, Matt Jones, somebody most of us had never heard of, is leading the tournament by two strokes. Jason Day is in second. Should be some good golf this afternoon.

It’s kind of funny how Donald Trump is driving the Republican field mad. Oh, did Roger Ailes declare an unconditional surrender to Donald Trump? Looks like he has.

July unemployment numbers continue to slowly improve. The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 5.3%. The economy added 215,000 new jobs.

Melissa Harris-Perry along with her husband James Perry have written a great article on Black Lives Matter and tying it to New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. She argues that the movement really started back in New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. I think she’s right. This article is worth a read (here are a couple paragraphs) –

Hurricane Katrina did not hit New Orleans directly, and the city would have recovered swiftly from the extensive but manageable damage caused by winds and rain alone. But in the hours after the storm hit, several critical levees failed as powerful storm surges swept against decades of inadequate infrastructure. This part of the Katrina story is old and simple: By refusing to invest adequately in the public infrastructure needed to protect the most economically vulnerable and racially marginalized communities, the federal, state, and local governments left New Orleans open to massive devastation and long-term economic losses that affected every single neighborhood.

A decade later, we remain locked in maddening partisan battles as our public infrastructure crumbles beneath us—as if the consequences are irrelevant, or distant, or easily contained. ­Katrina already taught us that the fate of black lives cannot be separated from that of whole communities. Black lives matter.

The federal deficit continues to shrink as thoughtful economists said it would.

AT&T helped the US by on Internet traffic. Are you surprised?

I am completely confused by the young couple in Mississippi that are linked to ISIS.

West, Texas

I find it funny that Texas government officials are falling all over themselves to let the residents of West, Texas know that they are large and in charge. I know that many in Texas and around the country believe with all of their hearts that the government is useless. The scariest thing is that old Ronald Reagan line, “I’m from the government and I’m here to help.”

Well, now, the good folks of West need help. They need someone to check the air quality and make sure that it is safe. Who’s going to do that? They need low-interest long- and short-term loans so that they can rebuild. Who’s going to do that? The town will need grants to rebuild infrastructure. This is where the government needs to step up and do their jobs.

Now, I don’t know what caused the explosion in West, Texas. I do know that for the most part plants do not spontaneously combust. Ammonium nitrate is the compound that was made at the West plant. This product is made by a simple chemical reaction. The chemical reaction gives off an enormous amount of heat.

Texas should be very aware of the dangers of ammonium nitrate. A vessel carrying tons of the material exploded in the Texas City harbor in 1947. 581 people died. This disaster resulted in one of the first class action lawsuits.