Tag Archives: badness

News Roundup – Government Shutdown, Iran, Marital Secrets

Navy yard shooter – Aaron Alexis

For those who like the creepy or macabre, there’s video of Aaron Alexis walking around the Navy Yard with a Remington 870 shotgun.

I don’t see how we avoid a government shutdown. The Democrats are not going to negotiate on a bill that’s already passed Congress and has already been verified by the Supreme Court. ObamaCare is the law of the land. The Democrats are not going to back down or cave on this issue. President Barack Obama said that he is not going to negotiate with the good faith and credit of the American government. I think this is the stance he should’ve taken years ago. Instead, he capitulated, waffled and negotiated. I believe this has emboldened Republicans to believe that they only need to bluster in order for Democrats to go and cower in the corner. This time, it looks to me like Democrats are going to hold strong. There’s a significant fraction of the Republicans in the House who don’t believe in negotiation. Therein lies the impasse. There was a ridiculously cute story in the Washington Post this morning. Some reporter went to Westchester, Ohio, which is in John Boehner’s district. The reporter walked around and talked to a bunch of his constituents about the imminent government shutdown. Nobody knew anything. It seemed as if nobody knew that there was an imminent government shutdown. One gentleman said, “they’ll work it out – they always do.” I think this guy is 100% wrong. I think we are in for some significant badness.

By the way, in case anybody was noticing, the Senate voted to restore funding to ObamaCare. Is anyone surprised? Continue reading News Roundup – Government Shutdown, Iran, Marital Secrets

Sequester Badness

Sequester pain

The Sequester is causing widespread pain.

From EPI:

State budgets rely heavily on federal funding— in 2011, federal grants to state and local governments totaled $607 billion. The sequestration cuts that went into effect on March 1 are a prime example of the impact federal fiscal policy decisions can have on state and local budgets, as well as their overall economies. Sequestration cuts $85 billion from government spending for the rest of fiscal 2013. As this recent EPI paper details, this means a $5.1 billion reduction in federal funding for state grants, relative to federal funding levels that were in place when sequestration went into effect. Because states use these grants to fund vital services such as infrastructure improvements, education, social services and public safety efforts, these cuts will not only hurt state economies but will also mean real losses for working families across the country.

The March 1 sequestration resulted in all 50 states and the District of Columbia losing varying amounts of federal grant funding, ranging from a 3.36 percent cut for Wyoming to a 0.68 percent cut for Tennessee. Many programs were subject to sequestration cuts. A few examples of programs that saw their grant funding cut under sequestration include Title 1 education programs, Head Start, and the WIC Supplemental Feeding Program. For context, two of the most populous states (with presumably large programs), California and Texas, experienced the following losses in grant funding due to sequestration: $28.2 million for the Texas Head Start program, $58.2 million for the California WIC supplemental feeding program, and $83.3 million for California Title 1 funding for local education agencies.

Disaster in Dallas

I grew in the ’60s and ’70s. The Dallas Cowboys won. They were a team that other teams tried to be. Now, not so much. The Dallas Cowboys are awful. I can’t explain a five-interception performance by Tony Romo. Miscommunication. Sloppy ball handling. Dropped passes. The Cowboys were simply awful. The only hope is for some type of New York Giants turnaround of the season. Jason Garrett is not Tom Coughlin. Tony Romo is not Eli Manning.

The score 34-18 does not tell the story. The Chicago Bears destroyed the Dallas Cowboys on Monday Night Football. This wasn’t as bad as the 44-0 beat down that the Bears laid on the Cowboys back in 1985, but it was close. Jay Cutler looked like a seasoned veteran who was cool in the pocket. Tony Romo looked like a rookie. I have made hundreds of excuses for Tony because there are times when he looks great. Unfortunately, he doesn’t seem to have the ability to fix badness in the middle of a game. He doesn’t seem to be able to turn it up a notch. It is what it is with Tony. If he comes out hot, then the Cowboys have a chance to win. If he doesn’t… well, then the Cowboys are going to lose.

I could almost excuse the interceptions, but we were playing the Bears. They weren’t mixing up their coverages. Romo forced some balls into their patented cover to defense. Dez Bryant dropped a touchdown. Romo overthrew to a wide-open Miles Austin. Brandon Marshall was running through our “upgraded” secondary like it was last year’s secondary. Ugly. Ugly. Ugly.

The problem with the Cowboys is their offense. They can’t run the ball. They can’t run block. They can’t pass block. They can’t catch (Dez Bryant and Jason Witten have dropped more balls in the first four games of this year than they did all of last year). Only Jacksonville and the Colts have scored fewer points over the course of four games. At this rate, it might be time to call Terrell Owens and see if he is interested in playing some wide receiver. It is time for Jerry Jones to do something. This is embarrassing. (I’m thinking of burning my Cowboys t-shirts, baseball caps and other stuff in protest.)

I hate to say that the season is over after four games, but without some significant changes, the season is over. Where are Jimmy Johnson, Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith and Michael Irvin? It brings a tear to my eye to remember that kind of excellence.