Tag Archives: aftermath

Voting and Assault Weapons

President Bill Clinton was right when he said, “A great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon.”

From TP:

While Clinton also called on America to implement health care reform and invest in science and education, the gun line elicited the biggest controversy, leading Alex Seitz-Wald to fact-check the claim. As it turns out, Clinton is correct: individuals can buy assault weapons without showing identification in more than 30 states, while federal law prohibits states from allowing individuals to vote without some form of identification. In recent years, 13 states have passed stricter voter ID requirements and half a dozen more are considering voter suppression measures in the aftermath of the Supreme Court ruling invalidating a key section of the Voting Rights Act.

In fact, a ThinkProgress analysis found that anyone can obtain assault rifles from unlicensed dealers at gun shows or online without a background check in 39 states. Zero states allow people to vote without some proof of identification:

Susan Rice

Ambassador Susan Rice

Well, damn. It is official. Susan Rice, are Ambassador to the UN, has officially removed her name from consideration for the Secretary of State position that will be vacated by Hillary Clinton at the beginning of the year. This should be no surprise to anyone. Susan Rice, unlike Lindsey Graham, John McCain and other Senate Republicans, is a well-trained, ethical, thoughtful, intelligent woman. I am deeply saddened that she withdrew her name because of the ridiculous bloviating of Senate Republicans.

From the New York Times:

Susan E. Rice, the Obama administration’s ambassador to the United Nations, has withdrawn her name from consideration for secretary of state, in the face of relentless opposition from Republicans in Congress over her role in the aftermath of the deadly attack on the American Mission in Benghazi, Libya.

In a letter to President Obama, Ms. Rice said she concluded that “the confirmation process would be lengthy, disruptive and costly — to you and to our most pressing national and international priorities. The tradeoff is simply not worth it to our country.”

Mr. Obama, who spoke with Ms. Rice on Thursday, said he accepted her request with regret, describing her as “an extraordinarily capable, patriotic, and passionate public servant.”

The Wisconsin aftermath

By now, everybody should know that Scott Walker, Governor of Wisconsin, won the recall election. The question is what we will have learned in the Wisconsin aftermath. For my money, I need to go back to the 50-state strategy that Howard Dean employed. Here is a map of Wisconsin by county.

We cannot concede every single rural county to Republicans. We have to contest everywhere. Until we are able to get out a viable message to rural America, we’re going to continue to lose races that we should win.