News Roundup – Galaxy Note 5, PGA Championship, Trump

Galaxy Note 5 by Samsung. I love the Note 4. It is the best phone that I have ever owned. Great camera. Great battery life.

One of the truly funny and amazing things about golf is that the supposedly “smart guys” will set up a scenario. For the PGA championship the scenario was Jordan Spieth versus Rory McElroy. They want this rivalry to develop so badly but it just hasn’t. At the beginning of round three, Matt Jones, somebody most of us had never heard of, is leading the tournament by two strokes. Jason Day is in second. Should be some good golf this afternoon.

It’s kind of funny how Donald Trump is driving the Republican field mad. Oh, did Roger Ailes declare an unconditional surrender to Donald Trump? Looks like he has.

July unemployment numbers continue to slowly improve. The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 5.3%. The economy added 215,000 new jobs.

Melissa Harris-Perry along with her husband James Perry have written a great article on Black Lives Matter and tying it to New Orleans and Hurricane Katrina. She argues that the movement really started back in New Orleans in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. I think she’s right. This article is worth a read (here are a couple paragraphs) –

Hurricane Katrina did not hit New Orleans directly, and the city would have recovered swiftly from the extensive but manageable damage caused by winds and rain alone. But in the hours after the storm hit, several critical levees failed as powerful storm surges swept against decades of inadequate infrastructure. This part of the Katrina story is old and simple: By refusing to invest adequately in the public infrastructure needed to protect the most economically vulnerable and racially marginalized communities, the federal, state, and local governments left New Orleans open to massive devastation and long-term economic losses that affected every single neighborhood.

A decade later, we remain locked in maddening partisan battles as our public infrastructure crumbles beneath us—as if the consequences are irrelevant, or distant, or easily contained. ­Katrina already taught us that the fate of black lives cannot be separated from that of whole communities. Black lives matter.

The federal deficit continues to shrink as thoughtful economists said it would.

AT&T helped the US by on Internet traffic. Are you surprised?

I am completely confused by the young couple in Mississippi that are linked to ISIS.