News Roundup – Jobs, Bin Laden, Trump, Airplane Engines

New jobs report

Although the headline number for job creation was below expectations, this was still a decent report.   Some positives include more wage growth (see below), fewer part-time workers for economic reasons, fewer long-term unemployed, and a decline in U-6 (an alternative measure of underemployment).

Earlier: April Employment Report: 160,000 Jobs, 5.0% Unemployment Rate

A few numbers:  Total employment is now 5.5 million above the pre-recession peak.  Total employment is up 14.2 million from the employment recession’s low.

Private payroll employment increased 171,000 in April, while government employment declined 11,000 in April, mostly at the Federal level.  Private employment is now 5.8 million above the pre-recession peak. Private employment is up 14.6 million from the recession low.

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Prince dead at age 57

Prince belongs with a handful of musicians who changed everything. After you heard Purple Rain (or When Doves Cry, I Wanna Be Your Lover, or Pop Life), music changed for you a little bit. It was different. Better. Richer.

Prince. His Purple Badness is dead at age 57.

From Rolling Stone:

A singular force, he famously performed, produced and wrote nearly all of his own songs at the beginning of his career and would go on to build a music empire out of his home near Minneapolis as he expanded his musical vocabulary. Four of his albums topped the Billboard 200, and the RIAA awarded 20 of his LPs with gold, platinum and multiplatinum plaques.

At the peak of his career in the early Eighties, Prince embraced acting. He starred in the 1984 blockbuster Purple Rain and would go on to appear in 1986’s Under the Cherry Moon and 1990’s Graffiti Bridge, the latter two of which he also directed. He also wrote the screenplay for Graffiti Bridge.

Prince won several awards for his music in his lifetime. His first major trophy was a Grammy for his Purple Rain album in 1984; that same year, he also won a Grammy for writing “I Feel for You,” which Chaka Khan had made a hit. The next year, he took home an Oscar for the Purple Rain score in 1985. The following year he earned another Grammy for “Kiss,” and won two more in 2004 for the songs “Musicology” and “Call My Name,” both of his 2004 album Musicology. In 2007, he earned another for “Future Baby Mama,” off his Planet Earth LP. He won several MTV Music Video Awards dating back to the mid Eighties and he won a Golden Globe for “The Song of the Heart,” which appeared in Happy Feet.